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Housing market to remain open despite second lockdown

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Following the announcement from Boris Johnson on Saturday 31 st October, Robert Jenrick, Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, has confirmed that the housing market will continue to operate despite entering a second national...

COVID-19 and the impact on commercial landlords

Jenny Colvin
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There has been much in the news recently about the support available from the Government for businesses in an attempt to save the high street and the economy, but little has been said about the effect on commercial landlords. Jenny Colvin in our ...

COVID 19 - what does it mean for commercial tenants?

Jenny Colvin
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On 23 March 2020, the Government announced a lockdown for the United Kingdom in order to fight the outbreak of coronavirus. This meant that hundreds of thousands of businesses, large and small, were forced to close their doors to both their staff and the...

Changes to planning use classes; what does this mean for commercial property owners and occupiers?

Jenny Colvin
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In amongst all the drama of 2020, it may have been easy to overlook the biggest overhaul of the planning system since the 1940s. Huge changes came into effect on 1 September 2020 and Jenny Colvin , Partner in our Commercial Property team, answers some of...

Extending the lease on my leasehold flat

Jenny Colvin
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When you buy residential leasehold property, such as a flat, you buy a term of years which has a finite, known end date. Whilst this term is unlikely to expire in your lifetime, mortgage lenders have recently become more and more unwilling to loan money...

Clarification provided for residential landlords regarding tenancy notice periods

Mollie Leak
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With several updates and changes in recent months, it’s understandable that residential landlords may be feeling slightly confused about where they stand regarding their possession proceedings or the notice periods. The good news is that the 3 months...

Amendments to possession proceedings due to come into force

Mollie Leak
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Further to The Civil Procedure (Amendment No.2) (Coronavirus) Rules 2020, that were introduced in June 2020, possession proceedings were stayed again up to 23 August 2020.  With this deadline soon approaching and the coronavirus restrictions continuing...

Tenant evictions and gas safety certificate warning for landlords

Mollie Leak
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Landlords are breathing a sigh of relief over the news that a Court has allowed an eviction notice despite a copy of the gas safety certificate not being provided before the tenancy started.  Mollie Leak , Litigation and Dispute Resolution ...

Stamp Duty holiday announced until March 2021

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Chancellor Rishi Sunak has today announced a temporary change to Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) which will now not be payable on properties sold for under £500,000.  The amendment forms part of the latest support from the Government in response to the...

Latest change to Energy Performance Certificates implemented - Information for Landlords

Alexandra Savage
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On 1 st April 2020, the latest stage of the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards was implemented, making it unlawful for landlords to continue domestic residential tenancies where the property has a rating of F or G on its Energy Performance Certificate...

Can I re-mortgage during coronavirus?

John Blake
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In light of recent Government guidance restricting moving home while we fight the coronavirus pandemic, our Residential Conveyancing team has been facing questions regarding whether similar restrictions apply to other areas of property, such as ...

Can I still release equity in my home during the coronavirus pandemic?

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With people facing a change in their financial circumstances due to the coronavirus outbreak, you may be wondering whether you can source an injection of funds by releasing equity in your home, either for you or to support your loved ones.  Kiri...

Guidance for residential landlords during the Covid-19 Outbreak

Mollie Leak
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The last couple of weeks have been ones of change for individuals, businesses, landlords and tenants as we adjust to a new way of life in light of the Covid-19 pandemic. Guidance has been released from Government on how this impacts landlords and tenants, in...

Government publish guidance on moving home during coronavirus pandemic

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The Government has overnight published new guidance for those who are currently buying or selling a property.  In light of the current restrictions on movement across the UK and the importance of self-isolating, it is understandable that this will...

Guide to Equity Release: Our top 6 frequently asked questions

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At an age where it may be challenging to access more traditional mortgage finance, equity release can supply you with the funds for your future plans. The money generated from equity release can be used for any purpose you have in mind, such as a once in a lifetime holiday, home improvements or even assisting a loved one in the purchase of their own property. In this guide Solicitor and Equity Release specialist, Kiri Saunders-Brown, details everything you need to know about equity release, including what it is, how long it can take, the safety of it and how it can impact Inheritance Tax. 

Guide to buying a home; our top tips for current owners and first time buyers

Sabrina Skerritt
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Buying a property is an exciting and momentous life milestone. Whether you are looking for a new home for an expanding family, or you are looking to start your climb up the property ladder, buying a home can be a complicated one and it’s important to understand the steps that will see you settle in to your dream property. In this guide, Conveyancing Executive, Sabrina Skerritt, details the three stages to buying a property, shares her top tips and details how we can help you if you’re a first time buyer.

Guide to selling your home; the top 5 things you need to know

Sabrina Skerritt
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Whether you are selling your home to make more room for a growing family, or you are looking for something smaller now that the nest has become less occupied, our aim is to make your move as stress free as possible. We also understand that selling your home can be an emotional time if you are selling the property that you shared with a loved one, or a family home that your children grew up in. Here, Conveyancing Executive, Sabrina Skerritt, provides the ultimate guide for selling your home by detailing each step of the process, how to prepare your home for viewings, as well as selling your property through auction. 

How does equity release affect Inheritance Tax?

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As Inheritance Tax (IHT) is calculated based on the size of your estate, releasing equity in your home would reduce the value of your property and therefore lead to either less Inheritance Tax payable upon your death, or your estate may fall under the threshold completely, provided the equity released is spent and not invested.  It is important that you consider the wider impact this has on your estate and your future beneficiaries; Kiri Saunders-Brown, Equity Release specialist, discusses here how equity release affects Inheritance Tax and how we can support you if you decide you would like to release equity in your home.

Has section 21 been abolished for landlords to use?

Laura Blakemore
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The Government’s proposal to abolish section 21 notices has caused a feeling of uncertainty amongst landlords as to how they will go about regaining possession of their property if a tenant refuses to leave after the fixed term of their tenancy agreement expires. The Government has stated that the purpose of the abolishment is an attempt to remove no fault evictions so as to provide renters with the security of having a tenancy that cannot be ended through no fault of their own. The National Landlord’s Association have specified that “over 96% of landlords would consider the leaving the market without section 21”.

Should I downsize or release equity?

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Downsizing and equity release are effective ways to fund your plans for later life, or to help a loved one onto the property ladder.  They both have their pros and cons and the right option for you will depend on your own personal situation.  Kiri Saunders-Brown, Solicitor and Equity Release specialist, explains here why equity release may be right for you, and why more people are choosing this option opposed to downsizing.

Warner Goodman joins the Equity Release Council

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Equity release is an increasingly popular way for individuals to fund their retirement or help a loved one onto the property ladder.  In recent years the practice has become more regulated in order to protect those releasing equity, namely with the introduction of the Equity Release Council (ERC) in 1991. We are delighted to have now joined the ERC; here Kiri Saunders-Brown, Equity Release specialist, explains more about why we have joined and how we can help you if you are considering equity release.

Is equity release safe?

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Despite past concerns, equity release is now considered to be a safe and effective way of raising funds. Releasing equity is fully regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority, and we can offer further protection as we are a member of the Equity Release Council. 

Should I still apply for a Help to Buy ISA?

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With Help to Buy ISAs set to be shut down on November 30th 2019, you may be wondering if it is still worth opening one. Here Sarah Brooks, Head of our Residential Conveyancing department, explains why Help to Buy ISAs are still a good way to get your foot in the door as a first time buyer, and the difference between a Help to Buy ISA and a Lifetime ISA.

Reassurance for tenants over section 21 notices

Helen Porter
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The abolishment of eviction notices under section 21 of the Housing Act 1988 could be seen as a positive move for tenants as they will remove the ability for landlords to evict them without a justifiable reason. However, there is a concern from the Resident Landlords Association (RLA), which is the largest representative for landlords within the UK, that “landlords will be more selective when this abolishment is in place”. Understandably, this raises causes for concern for current and future tenants.

Can I use equity release to buy a second property?

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If you own your current property and are over 55 years old (some schemes may apply different age requirements), you can release equity in order to buy a second property, or it may be more appropriate to consider re-mortgaging or a buy-to-let mortgage.   Kiri Saunders-Brown, Equity Release specialist in our Southampton office, explains how you can do this and the factors you need to consider in order to proceed with the right decision for your own circumstances.

How long does it take to release equity?

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Depending on the equity release plan you choose, it usually takes between 6 to 8 weeks to release equity in your home, assuming there are no complications along the way. With this route of raising funds becoming more popular, Kiri Saunders-Brown, Equity Release specialist in our Southampton office, explains the various stages to equity release and the timescales involved.

Tenant Fees Act now in force

Helen Porter
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The Tenant Fees Act sets out the Government's approach to banning letting fees paid by tenants in the private rented sector and capping tenancy deposits in England.  The aim of the Act is to reduce the costs that some tenants have to pay, and...

Will Brexit frustrate a commercial property lease?

Alexandra Savage
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The High Court has recently announced their decision in a pinnacle case regarding whether Brexit could frustrate a commercial property lease.  Alexandra Savage , Commercial Property Solicitor in our Portsmouth office, reviews the outcome of the case....

Do I need to see a Solicitor before I release equity in my home?

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Releasing equity in your home is an effective, and increasingly popular, way of raising funds to help your children onto the property ladder, make renovations, go on that once in a lifetime holiday or have a more solid financial foundation for your retirement. 

Could no fault eviction become a thing of the past?

Helen Porter
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On the 15th April 2019, the Government announced proposals to repeal section 21 of the Housing Act 1988, which provides a no fault procedure for a landlord to recover possession of their tenanted property.  Were the proposals to proceed, the future of tenant evictions and repossessions would be drastically altered. Helen Porter, Partner in our Litigation and Dispute Resolution team, reviews the proposals and the steps landlords can take to protect their property in the future.

Tenant Fees Act to be implemented from 1st June 2019

Helen Porter
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Our Litigation and Dispute Resolution team have previously discussed the progress of the Tenant Fees Act through the Houses of Parliament, but the Act has now received royal assent and shall come into force on 1 June 2019. From this date, landlords and letting agents are only able to charge for the deposit, rent and restricted default fees. Helen Porter, Partner in the team, reviews the changes being introduced and explains the steps landlords should take now to remain compliant.

Stamp Duty Land Tax on derelict residential properties

Joe Taylor
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A recent Tribunal decision has considered whether derelict residential properties are liable to the 3% surcharged rates for Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT). Joe Taylor, Commercial Property Solicitor in our Portsmouth team, considers the outcome of the case and...

Do I have a nuisance claim against my neighbours because of Japanese Knotweed?

Helen Porter
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Our Residential Conveyancing team have previously discussed how to spot Japanese Knotweed on your property, but could you have legal grounds to make a claim if your neighbour’s land has Japanese Knotweed that is encroaching upon your land? ...

Landlords warned on fitness for human habitation ahead of new Act

Helen Porter
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On 20 March 2019 the Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation) Act 2018 (the Act) will come into force in England. The Act will give tenants the right to take court action for breach of contract if a property is not fit for human habitation at the start of and throughout their tenancy.  Helen Porter, Partner in the Southampton based Litigation and Dispute Resolution team, explains the amendments being introduced by the Act and what they mean for landlords

Redevelopment Repercussions - how to terminate a business lease due to redevelopment

Helen Porter
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Landlords will be familiar with the protection afforded to business tenants when it comes to lease renewal under the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954.  At the end of WWII, commercial property was at a premium.  Business tenants found that when they...

GAGA about AGAs

Jenny Colvin
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An option available to a tenant under a commercial lease is the ability to assign (or transfer) the lease to a third party. This will usually require the landlord’s consent. One of the conditions of a landlord giving their consent will inevitably be...

How do I know if a property is affected with Japanese Knotweed? A New Heatmap may be the answer.

Genni Cooper
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Japanese knotweed has become well known in the UK as a nuisance plant, which can lead to structural damage due to its aggressive nature and ability to grow through materials such as concrete and tarmac.  Genni Cooper, Solicitor in our Fareham...

Changes to Stamp Duty Land Tax; will you be affected?

Jenny Colvin
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The landscape of Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) has changed significantly over recent years, mainly for first time buyers.  That landscape is set to change once more on 1 st March as the deadline for submitting SDLT returns will reduce.  Jenny Colvin,...

Do I need a survey when purchasing a property?

Genni Cooper
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When purchasing a property, it can be confusing to know whether a survey is needed, what type of survey is best and who is responsible for organising this.  Genni Cooper, Associate Solicitor in our Waterlooville Residential Conveyancing team, explains...

Should I release equity in my home?

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Equity release as a concept is not new, but equity release products are growing in popularity.  The number of products on the market has doubled in the two years to August 2018, and lending through such schemes grew for the seventh consecutive year in...

First Time Buyers are at a record high

Genni Cooper
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New statistics released from the First Time Buyers 2018 report, produced by Yorkshire Building Society, have highlighted a significant increase in the level of First Time Buyers (FTBs).  Genni Cooper, Residential Conveyancing Solicitor, here reviews the...

Commercial property leases and the unknown impact of Brexit

Alexandra Savage
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An interesting and pinnacle case is about to go to court as to whether Brexit can frustrate a lease – bringing it to an end and releasing the parties from their obligations. Alexandra Savage, Commercial Property Solicitor, explains the facts of the...

How can I move home by Christmas?

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With Christmas only six weeks away, there are many of you who will be looking to move into your new home in time for the Christmas festivities.  To help you pick up those keys ready to put up your tree, decorate the house and cook your Christmas...

Company Voluntary Agreements in commercial property

Helen Porter
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In recent months, there has been a growing trend in the way commercial tenants are using a particular type of insolvency prevention procedure, known as a Company Voluntary Agreement, to reduce the amount they are paying to their landlords. Here Helen Porter,...

Commercial Property Standard Enquiries - the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth

Jenny Colvin
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If you have bought, sold or rented commercial property, then you may have heard your legal adviser refer to Commercial Property Standard Enquiries, or more commonly known CPSE.   While the name may refer to them as ‘standard’, if you...

Joint tenants or tenants in common; which is best for me?

Jane Cox
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Owning a property comes with many considerations; one of them being whether you own your property as tenants in common or as joint tenants.  Jane Cox, Private Client Partner, explains here the difference between the two statuses, and why they are...

How is "Retaliatory Eviction" likely to affect you?

Helen Porter
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From 1 October 2018, all Assured Shorthold Tenancies will be subject to the rules that were introduced by the Deregulation Act 2015 (‘the Act’), which outlines situations when a landlord can terminate a tenancy under Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988. Helen Porter, Partner in the Litigation and Dispute Resolution team, explains how the Act affects landlords who are faced with a complaint about their property from their tenant, and why this may restrict you from serving a Section 21 notice.

Do you own a Taylor Wimpey Property?

John Blake
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The sale of new properties as leaseholds subject to ground rents that double regularly is a topic that has been featured a lot in the press in recent months. National builders, Taylor Wimpey, have responded to criticism and launched a scheme whereby they...

Landlords: Are you compliant with the Deregulation Act 2015?

Helen Porter
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When a landlord wishes to evict their tenant, it is vital that they follow the correct procedure for doing so, in order to avoid any unnecessary delays and wasted costs. This is particularly important given the upcoming changes in the law regarding landlords’ use of the procedure under Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988. Helen Porter, Partner in our Litigation and Dispute Resolution team, explains the changes in the law, and the steps landlords must take to ensure they are compliant.

Buying a property for your child; know the rules around gifting

Jane Cox
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All parents hope that one day their children will own their own home but with rising house prices and inflation, parents are being called upon to either house their children while they save for the deposit or gift the deposit themselves.  Jane Cox,...

It's not doom and gloom for the housing market

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Recent comments made by Bank of England governor, Mark Carney, may have existing and future property owners, as well as landlords and developers, concerned about the future following Brexit.  Sarah Brooks, Partner and Head of Residential Conveyancing,...

Draft Tenant Fees Bill Third Reading: Minor Victory for Landlords?

Helen Porter
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On September 5th the Tenant Fees Bill (the Bill) had its’ third reading in the House of Commons and the Bill has now been passed up to the House of Lords for consideration. Helen Porter, Litigation and Dispute Resolution Partner, explains how...

Illegal Eviction: what is it and what are the consequences?

Helen Porter
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When a landlord wishes to evict their tenant, it will not be a decision they have reached lightly and will invariably be the last resort.  There could be various reasons why they wish to do this, but there are also various steps they must follow to ensure any subsequent eviction is legal.  Helen Porter, Partner in our Litigation and Dispute Resolution team, explains the correct steps for landlords and the legal consequences if they do not evict their tenants legally.

Avoiding hedge wars

Helen Porter
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When tree roots extend into your neighbour’s property they can cause damage, especially if they are close to foundations of a building. Helen Porter, Partner in our Litigation and Dispute Resolution team, explains here the rights you have regarding tree roots and steps to take before legal action. 

Advice for landlords regarding Gas Safety Certificates and "no fault" procedure

Helen Porter
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When granting an assured shorthold tenancy of residential accommodation, you should ensure you are aware of the obligations you are required to satisfy both at the beginning of, and throughout the duration of the tenancy, otherwise you could face serious difficulty when trying to regain possession of your property. Helen Porter, Partner in our Litigation and Dispute Resolution team, explains these responsibilities here, and reviews a recent case highlighting the impact the failure to deliver a Gas Safety Certificate to a tenant can have on the validity of notice given under section 21 of the Housing Act 1988.

Bank of England interest rates rise to 0.75%

Pam Kamel
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The Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee last week announced that their interest rate will increase from 0.5% to 0.75% on 2 August 2018; the highest percentage since March 2009. Whilst this may mean that the interest rates in your savings...

Why do property transactions give rise to enhanced due diligence checks?

Pam Kamel
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Not a day goes by when we are not faced with news of identity theft or online fraud, and so it should be no surprise that if you are buying or selling a property, as your lawyers, we will ask you for several documents to confirm your identity and also query...

What do I need to consider with a short term lease of my property?

Pam Kamel
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In 2017, it was reported that over 80,000 British homeowners were trying to boost their income by advertising their properties on short term rental websites such as Airbnb.  With these numbers expected to rise to one third of homeowners by 2021, and...

Landlord responsibilities for tenant safety

Helen Porter
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As a landlord, one of the most important legal requirements is that you cover the basic safety practices and equipment in the property or properties you are renting.  Keeping your tenants safe should be your principal concern, so ensuring that these obligations are met is of the utmost importance.  Helen Porter, Partner and Litigation and Dispute Solicitor, clarifies the responsibilities of residential landlords regarding fire, gas and electrical safety, and explains how UK legislation applies in this area.

What is the law surrounding Tree Preservation Orders?

Helen Porter
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Barely a day goes by without a local newspaper recording the infringement of a Tree Preservation Order (TPO).  These are often accompanied by protestations from the accused claiming they had no idea that a TPO was in place and, more frequently, detailing the fines imposed against them (which can be as high as £20,000).  Helen Porter, Partner in our Litigation and Dispute Resolution team, clarifies the position on TPOs as well as offering advice to landowners and developers.

Number of first time buyers hits ten year high

Emma Gilliland
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The property market continues to show signs of progress as figures from UK Finance show 2017 saw the highest number of first time buyers since 2006.  Emma Gilliland, Residential Conveyancer, here reviews the figures and explains why this is good news for the housing market as a whole.

DCLG calls for transparency for clients buying a home

John Blake
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In recent months, several bodies have been calling for clearer options when it comes to individuals buying or selling their home, particularly when they require conveyancing services.  With the market awash with choices of legal services to provide this, John Blake, Senior Residential Conveyancer, evaluates the impact this call for transparency will have for clients, and why real client feedback and recommendations will always be a preferable place to start.

Warner Goodman have come to Chandler's Ford

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Hampshire law firm, Warner Goodman LLP, are delighted to announce the opening of our new office in Chandler’s Ford; the fourth office for the firm.  The firm already have offices in Southampton, Portsmouth and Fareham, providing a full range of legal services for people in their business and personal lives. 

Good news for property market as 200,000 new homes to be built

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In yet another move to drive the housing market forward, last week Chancellor Philip Hammond and Housing Secretary Sajid Javid announced the investment of £866 million for local housing projects.  

Dilapidations - the hidden costs of renting a commercial property

Jenny Colvin
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The term ‘dilapidations’ refers to the wants of repair in a leasehold property for which the tenant is responsible.  At the end of the term of the lease, the landlord will serve a terminal schedule of dilapidations on the tenant.  

Stamp Duty and Shared Ownership

Nicki Davis
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In November last year, Philip Hammond announced in his Budget the abolishment of Stamp Duty for first time buyers; but where does it leave those first time buyers looking to buy a property through shared ownership?  

Could you identify Japanese knotweed and save your property?

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Springtime is traditionally the busiest time for the property market, but with a knotty problem affecting more homes than ever, it’s worth doing some horticultural homework before you start, whether you’re buying or selling.

No stamp duty for first time buyers

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Chancellor Philip Hammond announced in his Budget yesterday that Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) is to be abolished with immediate effect for first time buyers.  Sarah Brooks, Residential Property Partner, explains the practicalities of the move from the Chancellor and what happens next for first time buyers.

The Tenants Fee Bill: Government action ending Letting Agent fees

Helen Porter
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The private rented sector is made up of 4.5 million households in England.  Both landlords and tenants frequently pay Letting Agents to provide a valuable service in ensuring properties are managed; assisting landlords in complying with their legal responsibilities and helping tenants secure a home, being their first port of call for any maintenance and repair issues. 

What impact will the interest rate increase have on your property?

Anne Mills
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Last week saw the interest rate rise from 0.25% to 0.5%; the first increase in ten years.  The news has been welcomed by some as a sign of improving economic times, but homeowners have been wondering how this will impact them in particular.  Anne Mills, from the firm's Residential Conveyancing team, explains what the rise means in real terms for homeowners.

Southampton named as most affordable location for first time buyers

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A recent survey by HSBC revealed that UK millennials, ie those born between the early eighties and the mid-to-late nineties, are less likely than their counterparts in other countries to own a home.  But there lies hope, and it lies in Southampton! Post Office Money recently interviewed more than 1,000 people who have bought their first property in the last two years.  

The future for Stamp Duty Land Tax - could it be reduced?

Emma Gilliland
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The cost of Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) is being held responsible by many in the property sector as to why there may be hesitation when it comes to purchasing a property, particularly for first time buyers and those looking to downsize following retirement.  Emma Gilliland, Residential Conveyancer, reviews here why there are proposals for this to be reduced in the future and brought more in line with current market activity, and why it causes a barrier to the housing market.

Help to Buy Scheme extended to 2021

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The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) has announced that the Help to Buy Scheme, which was launched in 2013, is to continue until at least 2021.  The news comes amid rumours that the scheme was to be scrapped, which led to shares in leading house builders falling earlier this month.  

Has your EPC certificate expired?

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EPC certificates were first launched on the 1st August 2007, and were introduced as a way to provide energy usage and costs on a property, as well as making suggestions about how the property could be more energy efficient.  This is based on a rating between A to G; A being most efficient and G least efficient.  

Unexpected positivity in property market following Election

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When the General Election was called in May, possible uncertainty in the housing market was forecast once again, similar to a year ago in light of the EU referendum.  Recent research however, and figures from local law firm Warner Goodman, has shown that this has not been the case, and the property market continues to grow apace.  

More positive news for the Hampshire housing market

Paul Winslade
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The recently published Housing Price Index has shown more positive news for home owners across Hampshire.  Paul Winslade, Residential Property Partner, reveals the latest figures and what this means for the property market in the South.

Positive news for the property market as number of first time buyers continue to grow

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The housing market across the UK continues to stabilise since the uncertainty in 2016, as news comes from various sources showing that the number of first time buyers remains on the rise month on month, boosting the overall market for all home owners and potential buyers.  

Will new cashback mortgage help people buy a property?

John Blake
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A new cash back mortgage has been launched by Barclays Mortgages in an effort to assist more people onto the property ladder.  The Barclays Homebuyer Cashback Mortgage will give buyers either £1,250 or £2,500 to put towards the stamp duty costs on their new property.  John Blake, Residential Conveyancer, here reviews the mortgage and explains who could benefit most from it. 

How shared ownership could get you onto the property ladder

Paul Winslade
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While shared ownership has been around for many years, its popularity has only started to grow in the last 12 months; a fact highlighted in a recent report released by Orbit and Chartered Institute of Housing.  Paul Winslade, Residential Conveyancing Partner, explains exactly what shared ownership is and how it is helping first time buyers to purchase their home.

Garden village Welborne to come to Fareham

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As the housing market improves, so does the availability of homes in Hampshire as news comes of a new garden village to be developed in the area, sharing access to a £6million fund over the next two years.  Welborne will be situated just outside Fareham as part of the Government’s new Garden Village framework in a bid to provide high quality, affordable housing.

Forces Help to Buy Scheme extended

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Michael Fallon, Defence Secretary, recently announced that the popular Forces Help to Buy Scheme, which was due to close in April this year, has been extended to 2018.  The news comes as Mr Fallon revealed that the Government target to double the number of service personnel application approvals to 10,000 has been met.

Positive news for Hampshire property market as first time buyer figures rise for first time in 10 years

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Signs of the recovery of the UK property market were proven once again today as new figures show the number of first time buyers in 2016 reached its highest level since the start of the financial crisis in 2007.  Sarah Brooks, Residential Conveyancing Partner, here reviews the news across the UK as well as here in the South.

Are your tenants disqualified from living in the UK?

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From 1 December 2016, a landlord or agent will have committed a criminal offence where they know or have ‘reasonable cause to believe’ that any property they are letting is occupied by someone who is disqualified from residing in the UK, regardless of when the tenancy was granted.  This is due to Sections 39 to 41 of the Immigration Act 2016 amending the Immigration Act 2014 to enhance the ‘right to rent’ regime. 

What does the Autumn Statement mean for the Hampshire property market?

Paul Winslade
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Chancellor Philip Hammond’s Autumn Statement on 23rd November reviewed many areas for this Parliament to be working on, with housing first on the agenda as a priority to build more affordable housing.  Paul Winslade, Residential Conveyancing Partner, here reviews the key points arising from the Autumn Statement, as well as the ramifications for tenants, landlords and first time buyers in Hampshire.

How could a Power of Attorney help those in the military?

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Serving in the armed forces will naturally mean spending time overseas, but what about your life at home while you are away?   If you are looking to buy or sell your home and then are deployed, there will be matters to arrange, and with you not contactable this could lead to unnecessary delay or even the house purchase or sale falling through. Sarah Brooks, Head of our Residential Property team, explains here how a Power of Attorney could help you keep things on track.

Autumn Statement could bring more property tax changes

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Recent years have seen many changes to property tax and it appears this is unlikely to stop as Community and Local Government Secretary, Sajid Javid, has hinted that more could come in this month’s Autumn Statement.

Hammond makes housing market his priority

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During last month’s Conservative Party Conference, Chancellor Philip Hammond announced his plans to take the focus away from the budget surplus and instead invest in the development of new homes.

Housing market sees confidence return with enquiries increasing

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Following many changes and uncertainty to the market in recent months, it seems the housing market is on the road to recovery as the National Association of Estate Agents (NAEA) revealed in their August Housing Market report that the supply of housing has risen to the highest level seen since March this year. 

Section 8 and Section 21 - What's the difference?

Helen Porter
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When attempting to obtain possession of your property as a landlord (when it is let out on an Assured Shorthold Tenancy Agreement), there are two routes that can be followed. Helen Porter, Partner in our Litigation and Dispute Resolution team explains how Section 8 and Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988, as subsequently amended, can assist.

Almost 9,000 service personnel have benefit from Forces Help to Buy, why not you?

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Those serving in the Army, RAF or Navy can struggle to get on the property ladder; they are not always based in the UK and can find it harder to raise a deposit.  These members of our society make a commitment for our country and so in April 2014, the Forces Help to Buy Scheme was launched.  Earlier this year, for their two year anniversary it was announced that loans have reached £100million.

Freehold management - the strategies

Jenny Colvin
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With the influx of new Landlords prior to the Stamp Duty Land Tax (“SDLT”) rate increase on 1st April 2016, these Landlords will now need to consider the strategies of managing their properties and establish which method suits them best.

Consumer Regulations in relation to Building Contracts

Torion Bowles
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The Consumer Rights Act 2015 made significant changes to the rights and obligations of parties in business to consumer contracts.

Disputes arising out of Building Contracts

Torion Bowles
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Disputes commonly arise out of building contracts. These could include arguments as to quality or price, being kicked off site or being asked to do more than what was initially agreed.

New amendment to Town and Country Planning Act 1990 to speed up neighbourhood planning

Helen Porter
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The Housing and Planning Bill has now had its second reading in the House of Lords on 26 January 2016, after passing through the House of Commons. The next stage for the bill is scrutiny by a House of Lords committee who will look at the bill line by line. The committee will produce a report on the Bill and it will then go for a final third reading in the House of Lords before both Houses consider any amendments and the Bill receives Royal Assent.